BCATPR Workshop 2016 Speakers

 

Dr. Ernie Chang

President Elect, Society of General Practice of BC
Management Committee Lead, Physician Data Collaborative

The virtual patient: Information management requirements for overcoming barriers to access

 

Marc Pelletier

Senior Strategic Advisor, BC Ministry of Health

Building a province-wide strategy for Virtual Care

 

 

Cathy Yaskow

Director, Information Stewardship, Access & Privacy, Island Health
Provincial Co-Chair, Health Information Privacy and Security Operations Committee

The push and pull of privacy and digital healthcare practice: Harnessing power for “patient good”

 

Patient Panel on Privacy

Brenda JagroopColleen McGavinJean ShepherdKyle Warkentin 

Patient Voices Network Members

The patient perspective on telehealth: benefits, privacy and security

 

 


 

Ernie Chang

Dr. Ernie Chang

President Elect, Society of General Practice of BC
Management Committee Lead, Physician Data Collaborative

 

Ernie Chang is a physician and computer scientist who has had the great fortune of having worked in many domains. At present, he is a GP, semi-retired after more than 10 years in group practice within Fee for Service.

As a computer scientist, he has been an academic at UVIC, a Department Head at the Alberta Research Council, created a startup that became public on the TSE, and was the CEO of a Health IT company. His research included decentralized systems, distributed health data bases, human-computer interface, computer assisted learning, groupware and artificial intelligence.

In health care, he has worked at Kaiser Permanente in SF, and created one of the first Electronic Health Records while there. Over the years, he has been a programmer in Medicare, and worked on record linkage, longitudinal patterns of care. Recently, he has been involved in the Physician Data Collaborative, which aims to aggregate data from EMRs for physician quality improvement. At present, he is engaged in health analytics in the area of child and youth mental health.

He serves on many Doctors of BC committees, including ones on health IM/IT and economics, and is the incoming President of the Society for General Practice of BC.

He does photography and plays the harmonica, and yes, has three computer screens in front of him and more TV PVRs than rooms. His bird-watching includes Leica binoculars and a blue-tooth rig to send audio from an outdoors microphone into the house without crimping wires.

 

The virtual patient: Information management requirements for overcoming barriers to access

The capabilities of the Internet to connect two or more parties with voice, video and other signals has significant potential to overcome barriers to access for appropriate health care. The vocabulary in BC has morphed from "Telemedicine" to "The Virtual Patient".

This concept extends far beyond specialized facilities for teleconferencing and assisted imaging devices, to the broad use of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) applications. Anyone with the right app can, anywhere, be in contact with their family physician, engage in a discovery and assessment session using voice and video, and have the physician decide to send labs, prescriptions, arrange followup, or call an ambulance. This benefit extends to all those seniors and frail who cannot access their family physicians, to those who are transportation challenged, to those who need specialist assessment not available for hundreds of miles. Counselling, psychotherapy, status checks, post-operative care, can all be conducted with the patient's team conveniently.

Using the Internet, and having access on BYOD devices, requires levels of security and privacy that are challenging. EMRs are not structured to either be interoperable or to support BYOD interactions. The ideal of having a single health record per person on a uniformly accessible is a solution for which accessible paths are more blocked than open. The tremendous activity in the USA (the American Telemedicine Association, ATA) and around the world reflects the energy being put into systems, implementations, delivery and governance. We can expect similar progress to occur in Canada and BC.

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Marc PelletierMarc Pelletier

Senior Strategic Advisor, BC Ministry of Health

 

Marc Pelletier is currently a Senior Strategic Advisor with BC's Ministry of Health. Prior to joining the Ministry, Marc helped lead clinical and support services in the Fraser Health Authority and its predecessor organizations for over 20 years. His responsibilities as a Vice President included clinical services such as Home Health, Mental Health, Public Health, Cardiac Services, Diagnostic Imaging, Lower Mainland Pharmacy Services, and Laboratory Medicine. He also spent many years leading corporate functions such as IT/IM, Strategic Planning, Quality Improvement and Clinical and Business Analytics. Marc has two masters degrees, one in Criminology and one in Health Administration, both from the University of Toronto.

 

Building a province-wide strategy for Virtual Care

Marc will provide an overview of the province wide planning processes underway to help answer the question: Virtual Care in BC: where to from here? He will highlight the character of the discussions thus far with providers, patients, health authorities and clinical leaders throughout the system. Some of the emerging themes will be presented for feedback from participants.

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Cathy Yaskow

Cathy Yaskow

Director, Information Stewardship, Access & Privacy, Island Health
Provincial Co-Chair, Health Information Privacy and Security Operations Committee

 

Cathy Yaskow is the Director, Information Stewardship, Access & Privacy at Island Health.  As a member of the provincial Strategic Information Privacy and Security Committee and Co-Chair of the Provincial Health Information Privacy and Security Operations Committee, she, along with her health sector privacy, security and clinical peers, a) monitors and provides direction and oversight to enable a harmonized and responsive approach to emerging healthcare and information management trends; and b) provides a centralized mechanism for stakeholders developing cross-health-sector specific initiatives to receive expert information privacy and security design advice, direction and/or centralized approval.

A Nurse and Family Clinical Nurse Specialist by background, Cathy has served in various direct healthcare, clinical and since 2001, corporate Information Privacy leadership roles during her 38 years in health care, the last 22 of which have been at Island Health and its predecessor organizations. Her clinical experience informs her understanding of the multifaceted and essential relationship between using and sharing personal information to deliver excellent care and service while respecting and upholding the privacy rights of the individuals who entrust us with their information. As a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals and a solution focused leader, Cathy is active at the local and provincial levels in incorporating accountable privacy-conscious practice behaviors into the fabric of healthcare and service delivery in BC.

 

The push and pull of privacy and digital healthcare practice: Harnessing power for “patient good”

The Push: Like it or not, technology is changing how we practice in a digital and increasingly virtual health care environment.  This technology “stallion” informs, enables and ultimately transforms our information sharing capabilities in support of providing excellent care and service to citizens.  

The Pull: With power comes responsibility. Without an equally transformed framework to guide responsible exchange and handling of sensitive health information, the power of this stallion is unbridled and can create havoc and harm. Just because you can do something…doesn’t always mean you should.

This presentation will discuss how, if at all, current information management and legislative frameworks support healthcare providers to direct this stallion’s power for patient good; identify challenges and explore emerging solutions to effectively harness and use the power of technology in a privacy-sensitive and patient-centric way. 

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Patient Panel on Privacy

Brenda Jagroop

Brenda Jagroop

Member, Patient Voices Network and UBC Health Mentors Program

 

Brenda Jagroop has experienced some of the effects that alternative versus traditional healthcare delivery techniques can have upon the management of chronic health conditions. She is interested in encouraging the development of non-traditional health service provision, and believes this could provide significant opportunities for increased patient knowledge, health care accessibility, and early intervention.

Brenda has participated in research trials, volunteers with Patients as Partners and Patient Voices Network, and is involved in the UBC Health Mentors Program.

 

Colleen McGavin

Colleen McGavin

Interim Patient and Stakeholder Engagement Lead, BC SUPPORT Unit
Member, Patient Voices Network

 

Colleen McGavin is a retired business educator, having taught courses in communication and office technology for nearly 25 years at Camosun College in Victoria, British Columbia. After graduating with her BA and professional diploma in secondary education, she completed a post-graduate designation in computer-based information systems, all at the University of Victoria. In 2014, she completed the training to become a certified member of the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2).

Colleen has extensive experience as a cancer patient and as a caregiver to her elderly parents and, since 2010, she has been an active volunteer with Patients as Partners|Patient Voices Network, a program that is supported through the BC Ministry of Health. She is also a patient advisor for Island Health Authority. Through these affiliations, she has worked with organizations such as the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council, Doctors of BC, the Ministry of Health, and the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. Colleen was a member of the interim governing council for BC’s Strategy for Patient Oriented Research (SPOR) SUPPORT Unit and collaborated on the business plan. She was subsequently hired as the interim patient and stakeholder engagement lead for the SUPPORT Unit, a position she currently holds.

 

Jean Shepherd

Jean Shepherd

Member, Patient Voices Network

 

Jean Shepherd retired as a Teacher of the Deaf in 1985 on medical grounds with a Mitochondrial Cytopathy, which was identified in 1991 after many specialist visits and related testing in the early days of knowledge of this condition. She felt very alone for a number of years until she acquired a computer and the Internet enabled her to meet others internationally with the same condition.

In 2001, feeling the need to give back support to others, Jean started two email-based support groups, for families with Mitochondrial Disease in Canada and for adults with Mitochondrial Disease internationally.

Jean’s language skills from deaf education gave her the ability to express a complex condition in easily-understood analogies and language. Social media raised the bar on support and the ability to meet more people, share knowledge and achieve a greater understanding of the condition. She advocated with the Adult Metabolic Diseases Clinic first to set up a face-to-face support group and subsequently to use Telehealth as a means of making support more available since the clinic covers all of BC and the Yukon.

Jean has had three years of experience with the Patient Voices Network. She is presently involved in a province-wide project aiming at improving home support for frail and complex care seniors and reducing the need for Emergency Room visits: the Comox Valley and Cowichan are the two initial centres chosen in Island Health.

 

Kyle Warkentin

Kyle Warkentin

Member, Patient Voices Network

 

Kyle Warkentin, from Vancouver, British Columbia, is a Bachelor of Health Administration student with a nursing education background from Dalhousie University. Kyle has been a member of Patient Voices Network for 2 years and is active with many engagement opportunities where he sees fit.

Kyle holds the position of Vice President External Communications with the Dalhousie Health Sciences Students Association. Kyle has a strong history of board/committee work with his dedication on numerous organizations such as the AIDS coalition of Nova Scotia, The Alzheimer Society of NS, the Schizophrenia Society of British Columbia, Chebucto West Community Health Board and numerous other committees and community appointments. Kyle sits on the Dalhousie University Board of Operations and creates meaningful connections between DalHSSA and the DSU.

Kyle is a proven leader, from his dedication to education to his commitment to the community. Kyle has travelled the globe including medical humanitarian and disaster recovery work in Ecuador, Canada, USA, Europe, and Zambia. While in Zambia, Kyle became motivated to create “Shoes for Souls” where he collected 60,000 pairs of new shoes to be sent to communities that are in need of protective footwear to help with prevention of infections. Kyle is dedicated to his community and is excited to be part of such a great event. Fun fact? Kyle is a pilot who has flown since he was 16 years old, flying a plane before driving a car.

 

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